Read the last media article: 2013-05-14_usa-hilo_harald-tribune_frontpage.pdf and 2013-05-14_usa-hilo_harald-tribune_page-9.pdf

TOPtoTOP arrives in Hawaii 2013 from TOPtoTOP on Vimeo.

The pictures from Galapagos you can see now here!
After 50 days and 6169 nautical miles on the Pacific Ocean we arrived finally in Hawaii.
On the way we had 2 emergence stops: In Cocos Island we glued our lower rudder bearing back in place surrounded by sharks, what made this repair quite an interesting job. Another stop was on Isabella Island in the Galapagos where Salina was able to check her infected knee at the local hospital; – the same hospital where we had the first ultra sound of Salina 9 years ago.
The direct line from Panama to Hawaii is about 4500 nautical miles. The reasons why we did a detour of about 1500 nm were: the wind, Salina’s knees and the failure of our communication system to receive weather reports.
Luckily we were able to transmit an “all is fine” to this blog and receive a weather report through the Beagle SSB network; – thanks to the relay of SY Sweet Surrender, SY Bidule and SY Full Mounty.
Because Salina’s knee did not improve, we were considering sailing to the nearest hospital in the Marquesas about 3000 nm away. Sabine should get an award for the best nurse on the Pacific: Thanks to her persistence and intensive care she managed to heel Salina’s knees after 20 days. This allowed us to change course and continue straight to Hawaii.
The main factor for our routing was determent by the wind. Because we left late from Panama, we missed the NE-trade winds north of Cocos Island begin of April and were forced to cross the equator to get into the SE-trade winds blowing South of the Galapagos.
We sailed from Cocos on a course of 210 degrees to cross the equatorial-counter-current and the region with unsteady winds in a right angle. We managed quite well and had for sure better wind- and current conditions, than boats going the common route straight from Panama to Galapagos.
In the SE-trade-wind-belt we went from the equator at about 0°S/90°W as far as 6°S/124°W, before we climbed north again. We crossed the equator a second time at 130°W and Neptune baptized Meret to “pilot wale” after one of these animals came alongside of Pachamama.
Crossing the equator at 130° was a good choice: Here the SE-trade-wind-belt nearly gets directly into the NE-trade-wind-belt and we have had only 2 days of unsteady winds and disturbances.
At 6°N/131°W the NE-trade wind were established perfectly and we set a course of 300° straight to Hawaii. On the 9th of May we celebrated Jacqui’s birthday and on the 10th of May our 12th wedding anniversary. Sabine’s magic kitchen skills were just great: we had fruits and vegetables till the end and thanks to the oven, donated by Annemarie, fresh bread every second day.
For the International Pacific Research Center we reported all the floating garbage we have seen. Result: Close to the coast line of Central – and South America there was a lot; the more we sailed into the Pacific the less garbage we have seen.
In the 50 days we have seen a fishing boat and a cargo ship. Compared to our first Pacific crossing in 2006 from Patagonia to the Marquesas at about the same time of the year, we have had more steady winds in the range of 15 to 28 kn, but less dolphins and much less wales.
The routine on board changed also quite a bit compared to 2006: Now with 4 children Salina 8, Andri 6, Noé 3 and Alegra 1, there is much more action and Pachamama transformed to a floating school.
While writing this report, the kids are counting the miles and each of them like to be the first to cry: “Land ahoy – Hawaii”!
With the first light we sailed into Hilo harbour on Tuesday the 14th of May 2013.
Escorted by the best rainbow ever over Muana Kea we were welcomed on Hawaii! George Valdez, the immigration and cusoms officer gave a warm welcome. We are already fun about these lovely people here!